Visit to a Korean Folk Village, then a traditional dinner

July 18 was a very full day indeed. After rehearsal and a festive lunch, the entire group visited a recreation of a Korean Folk Village, and the day ended — appropriately — with a traditional Korean dinner.

The folk village encompasses 243 acres, with more than 260 buildings representing the different regions of Korea, keeping alive the culture of the later Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910).

We enjoyed exhibitions of traditional blacksmithing, farming, paper making, wood carving, building, and many other arts and crafts. We were treated to a marvelous exhibition of equestrian feats and enjoyed a recreation of a traditional wedding ceremony.

Brave young horsemen
Brave young horsemen
Hand-carved masks were available for sale in several sizes

Hand-carved masks were available for sale in several sizes

Recreation of a traditional wedding ceremony
Recreation of a traditional wedding ceremony

An then, to dinner.

The entire group of over a hundred fit into two rooms, with the food served family-style to groups of four. The recipes were unaltered to accommodate Western tastes, and so a few dishes were a bit challenging. But there was such a constant flow of food I don’t think anyone went back to the hotel hungry. Dean Blocker made a surprise presentation of a Yale School of Music watch to everyone in the group. For this, and for arranging such a fabulous dinner, he was applauded enthusiastically.

Early on in the meal, the tables were neatly arranging with small plates, earthenware cups for drinking, and servings of cabbage, fish, noodles, and a few other delicacies.

Early on in the meal, the tables were neatly arranging with small plates, earthenware cups for drinking, and servings of cabbage, fish, noodles, and a few other delicacies.

By the end of the meal, you could barely see the table for the accumulation of plates and bowls.

By the end of the meal, you could barely see the table for the accumulation of plates and bowls.

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